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PBS
Jan 22, 2010 12:00pm EST
might be why we should be fascinated with saudi arabia? >> well, the obvious is 9/11 for america. 15 of the 19 hijackers are saudis. i tried to explain in my book how it was basically a saudi quarrel fought out on american soil with american victims. al qaeda, bin laden dedicated to bringing down the house of saad couldn't do it in saudi arabia with the near enemy as they called him so they came to america and attacked the far enemy. you paid the price for your years of friendship and closeness with saudi arabia. tavis: i was about to ask why did we end up being at the top of that list. you explain it now. you talk about it in the book, the price that we had to pay for our friendship with the saudis. >> well, it's america who exploited, discovered and developed saudi oil. back in the 1930's, the saudis chose america rather than the british, rather than us because we had been meddling in the middle east. the king of saudi arabia at the time liked the idea that america were far away. they would come and develop the oil and go away. america is on the other side of the world. after the w
PBS
Jan 12, 2010 7:00pm EST
billion, up almost 10% from october. >> susie: america's factories get a bad rap. many people think manufacturing is an industry with no growth and no jobs. but there's lots of optimism at one metal parts factory in new jersey. erika miller went there to find out why, and discovered that this one company may be part of bigger trend. >> we've seen a pick up in demand since about the middle of 2009 across all sectors. and it actually happened very quickly. >> reporter: jim mcclintock is the president of micro stamping, a company that cuts metal parts used in cars, medical instruments, computers, and airplanes. the company is located in this unassuming building in suburban new jersey. but don't let that fool you. its perspective is big. is it fair to say that although you're a new jersey-based manufacturer, you have your pulse on the global economy? >> we do have our pulse on the global economy, and it's absolutely imperative. today's manufacturing environment, it's so easy to transact business around the world fluidly. >> reporter: the company is reporting a steady increase of new ord
PBS
Jan 8, 2010 12:00pm EST
america. it really is. what i get out of an audience in 15 minutes a psychiatrist cannot get out of them in 15 years. you'll sit and listen about sex, religion, you think things are taboo, and they will sit there and listen and will not open their mouths, do not respond. but you talk about race and will flip in five, 10 minutes. >> why is race a fertile ground to navigate? >> because america is caught up in it. we are a melting pot. there are so many different nationalities, so many different races, people of different colors, it is just fun. tavis: when people think that you are being in politics, paul is being kilobit and politic -- paul is being a little bit incorrect, what you say? >> i am a comedian. people are like saints. we make people's lives better. it is true, without us, you guys would be miserable. especially in the political arena now. our economy, the way the world is, we need comedians. tavis: where does paul mooney find funny? >> in life. the funny it is in life. it is in this moment now, being with you. when i leave here, i will be talking about you. that is what funny
PBS
Jan 28, 2010 6:00pm EST
america-- committed to helping the nation's economic recovery. pacific life-- the power to help you succeed. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> lehrer: president obama road tested his new focus on jobs and the economy today. margaret warner begins our coverage of the tune i don't know aftermath. >> reporter: the president was greeted with applause by a friendly audience in tampa, florida. he and vice president joe biden unveiled $8 billion in grants for high speed rail, part of their new focus on jobs creation the president said again he understands what americans are going through. >> last night i've spoken about where we need to go and i've said these are difficult times, these challenging times for our country. in the last two years, we've gone
PBS
Jan 28, 2010 5:30pm EST
, this lonely outpost at barrow is america's northernmost climate laboratory. a snowy owl appears, a regular of this distant landscape. here the instruments have been measuring the arctic's changes. the rise in the greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide, and the retreat of the ice. the chief scientist shows me around. >> what we're looking at here is our main tower where we take our samples and pump them from this tower into the station for analysis. >> i want to take a look inside in a second, but just before we go in out of the cold, what kind of hazards do you face up here? >> we've seen polar bears out here and had to leave because it's better to let the polar bears be, let them take their course on through and come back later. >> you've got to keep a close watch every time? >> yes. >> let's get inside. so then this is where the air samples are pumped into? >> this is the main room where the analysis happens. the first thing that happens is the sample comes in from outside and goes through a chiller that takes all the water vapor out. water vapors are a real problem for what we're trying
PBS
Jan 2, 2010 4:30am EST
come. dan balz, author of "the battle for america 2008: the story of an extraordinary election," joan biskupic, the author of "american original," a biography of the supreme court justice antonin scalia, david sanger, author of "the inheritance," a look at the challenges of our foreign policy. >> celebrating 40 years of journalistic excellence, from our nation's capital, this is "washington week" with gwen ifill. produced in association with "national journal." corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- >> we know why we're here. to design the future of flight inside and out. >> to build tomorrow's technology in amazing ways. >> and reshape the science of aerospace forever. >> around the globe, the people of boeing are working together for the dreams of generations to come. >> that's why we're here. >> the johns hopkins global m.b.a., integrating expertise with international understanding to develop leaders for a better world. the johns hopkins carey business school, where business is taught with humanity in mind. >> funding is also provided by the annenberg foundation,
PBS
Jan 16, 2010 2:00am EST
, appointed by congress to find out how america got rolled, began hearings this week. these four are not the victims of one of the greatest bank heists in history; they're the perpetrators, bankers so sleek and crafty, they got off with the loot in broad daylight, and then sweet-talked the government into taxing us to pay it back. watching that scene on the opening day of the hearings, it was hard enough to believe that almost a year has passed since barack obama raised his hand, too, taking the oath of office to become our 44th president. even harder to remember what america looked like before obama, because we've also been robbed of memory, assaulted by what the nobel laureate czeslaw milosz described as a "fantastic proliferation of mass media." we live in a time "characterized by a refusal to remember." inconvenient facts simply disappear down the memory hole, as in george orwell's novel, "1984." president obama's made plenty of mistakes during his first year, and we've critiqued them frequently here on the journal, but hardly anyone talks anymore about what happened in the years bef
PBS
Jan 21, 2010 7:00pm EST
definitely win. >> ba about on the banking side, jpmorgan, bank of america, wellso, which of those banks stands to gain or lose? >> well, i think that if you take jpmorgan, the price of that stock is where it was 12, 13 years ago. it was selling at this price in 1997. it selling at this price because the structure of this company is wrong. it is too much consumer finance in if. and therefore if you eliminate that, and you take and sell, if you will,;jje of jpmorgan to investors, that will be worth a lot more than what jp morgan is today. if you take merrill lynch out of bank of america, merrill lynch is likely to sell for more than all of bank of america currently sells for at the present time. >> all right, very interesting way of looking at this situation. dick, thanks so much for coming on the program. >> thank you, sus yee. >> my guest tonight dick bove, financials analyst at rockdale securities. >> tom: here are the stories in tonight's "n.b.r newswheel". as we mentioned, stocks headed sharply lower on the president's proposal to reign in big banks. the dow dropped 213 points, the n
PBS
Jan 26, 2010 9:30pm EST
gets them. open this one for me and tell me what you think. that's from bank of america. and on the back it says 0% intro apr. >> yes, but there is an asterisk or whatever that mark, so i have to now read that footnote. i will have to remove my glasses to read it. it says, "for this, see disclosure summary insert for details." now i have to find a disclosure summary, which is the one here. so, on the outside, it says 0% intro apr; in here, it says that my apr is 11.9%, 15.9%, or 19.9%, right, and "the apr you receive is determined based on your credit worthiness," so i have no idea which one i am going to get when they approve me. >> bergman: so, disclosure, you say, doesn't work? >> i mean, look at how much time it takes for both of us to go through this. >> bergman: yeah, exactly. >> i think that your average consumer is not going to be able to translate what the real pricing is. >> bergman: now, you put out statements like this from providian. >> we did. we did, absolutely. >> bergman: well, the criticism is that it's exploiting the customer, the fact that they don't really under
PBS
Jan 8, 2010 10:00pm EST
. and you go on to say that in a very fundamental way, this financial lobby has changed america. what do you mean by that? that goes deeper than campaign contributions and money and even influence in washington. you say they've changed our framework. >> yeah, yeah. it goes a lot deeper. it's what simon johnson the chief... former chief economist for the i.m.f., it's what he calls intellectual capture. and... >> moyers: intellectual capture. >> right. it goes beyond regulatory capture, where, say the banks control the s.e.c. that's one thing. intellectual capture means that essentially the financial industry has convinced us, you know, in the '50s what was good for general motors was good for america. now it's what's good for wall street is good for america. and they've somehow convinced us that we shouldn't ask about what's right or what works or what's good for america. we should ask what's productive, what's efficient, what helps grow the economy. >> this is the stockholm syndrome. where you're hostage starts identifying with the people holding them captive. americans have been, you
PBS
Jan 27, 2010 9:00pm EST
tempting to look back on these moments and assume that our progress was inevitable, that america was always destined to succeed. but when the union was turned back at bull run and the allies first landed at omaha beach, victory was very much in doubt. when the market crashed on black tuesday and civil rights marchers were beaten on bloody sunday, the future was anything but certain. these were the times that tested the courage of our convictions and the strength of our union. and despite all our divisions and disagreements, our hesitations and our fears, america prevailed because we chose to move forward as one nation. as one people. again we are tested. and again we must answer history's call. one year ago i took office amid two wars, an economy rocked by a severe recession, a financial system on the verge of collapse, and a government deeply in debt. experts from across the political spectrum warned that if we did not act, we might face a second depression. so we acted. immediately and aggressively. and one year later, the worst of the storm has passed. but the devastation remains.
PBS
Jan 20, 2010 12:00pm EST
and they are not extending greece to anyone else. it turns out bank of america has so much money in bonuses it could have absolves the crisis for 2 million people, but they gave 100 loans. we fired bank of america. it is now a mini movement to move your money. the banks say they are too big to fail. i say make them smaller. in wall street there is a morality play going on. i think it is a cultural thing. greed is good. it is all about me, and i want it now. those messages destroyed economies but also cultures and our souls. i counter that with enough is enough. we are in this together. we evaluate decisions today. that would change things. >> i see greed is a good concept on wall street. what role do we play in rediscovering? >> my depression-era parents would not have spent money they did not have, and wells may not trickle-down, but bad values do. we have got to look at wall street, too. also, at ourselves, look in the mirror. crisis gives such it -- gives us a chance to reset. all of the pain and suffering in detroit is going to be in vain if we go back to business as usual, so h
PBS
Jan 27, 2010 12:00pm EST
that he needed in year one to change the tone of america around the world. i think if you could give him credit for one significant success, in his first year, it is that america is perceived very differently in europe and i think in the muslim world, the cairo speech and other speech hes gave began to reach out to the muslim world in a way that i think no other american president has. the problem he faces on the foreign front is that 2010 now has to be the year of deliverables. that's difficult. he reached out to iran and the iranians didn't reach back. he's committed 30,000 american troops, plus another 20 that he did earlier in his term, to afghanistan. but we won't know until the middle of this year at the earliest whether that's turning the tide. >> i heard you suggest, just a few moments ago, that you don't think personally as the chief washington correspondent for the new york times, you don't feel that he spent too little time on the economy, but that doesn't -- that doesn't square well with the polls and surveys i'm reading about what the american people think, david. >> tha
PBS
Jan 14, 2010 5:30pm EST
warm welcome to "bbc world news," broadcast to our viewers on pbs in america, also around the globe. my name is mike embley. coming up later for you -- finland declares war on the cigarette industry. >> it makes me very angry. it is like some kind of race. >> and a dog's life for real. how the breeding of some pedigreed dogs is putting the animal's health at risk. hello to you. amid the devastation, the desperation, an international armada of aid is on its way to haiti. but it is not there yet. said the bodies are still piled up. most of those buried alive for still in the wreckage left by one of the worst caribbean earthquakes in two centuries. this would be a challenge for any government, but for a state as impoverished as haiti, this is proving overwhelming. matthew price is in the haitian capital of port-au-prince. >> the sad truth is that things are getting worse, not better. he may make out this makeshift camp 40 internally displaced people here. we assume there are people displaced across the country as people are left homeless and try to find shelter to see themselves throug
PBS
Jan 5, 2010 5:30pm EST
america and around the world. coming up later, iceland's credit rating is downgraded yet further after the president orders a referendum on whether to repay international debt. and some net to nexus, google unveils its own gadget to challenge apple's iphone. hello. straight back from his vacation in hawaii, president obama is right now holding a meeting with his top security and intelligence officials at the white house. on the agenda, the failures and lessons learned from the christmas day airline bomb plot over detroit. the first face-to-face meeting for the president with his advisers since the suspect allegedly tried to bring down the plane with an explosive device. with the international spotlight once again on yemen, the white house says no more guantanamo detainees will be returned to the country. 91 of the 198 people still held at guantanamo are believed to be from yemen. let's go live now to the grand foyer of the white house where mr. obama is expected to speak at any moment now. the president of sun and a little late when it comes to the schedule as far as what he is e
PBS
Jan 6, 2010 7:00pm EST
today. she started off by describing the financial health of america's banks. >> the banks are raising an inordinate amount of capital throughout 2008 and 2009. so they're better positioned. some of the small banks won't make it and some of the larger banks will continue to have to sell assets to support themselves. >> gharib: a lot of the big banks have paid back the money in the bailout money. is it fair to say that they're healthy again? >> i would say they're healthier because of the government intervention and the change in accounting rules. but home prices are worth a lot less than banks are carrying them on their balance sheets. and real estate is worth a lot less in the actual markets than the banks are carrying on the balance sheet. you can't say this one is healthy, this one is not healthy. >> gharib: so when the banks start reporting their quarterly results where are the revenues coming from? >> that's a very good question because the banks make money out of the loan books and the loan books have been declining because they haven't been lending. from a fee perspective, you k
PBS
Jan 21, 2010 12:00pm EST
-ethnic america ever, this is not about race. what is the challenge for great leaders, for creative thinkers? for those people that, down the road and, we will call heroes? >> you look at the diversity of a town like new orleans. whether it was 100 years ago when louis armstrong grow up, taken in by the jewish family, of playing the music of gospel, plantations, creoles, marching bands and everything else, that makes the spanish, french, creole, american, black and white, it created great food and great music. that is the sound of our creativity. you look at that notion of celebrating that -- benjamin franklin did, during his lifetime he donated to the building fund of each and every church in philadelphia. at one point he said even if constantinople came here to teach us about islam, we should offer them a place that we might learn. he was the largest contributor to the synagogue in philadelphia when he was on his deathbed. it is that a multi-ethnic society that america has given the world. it is what we are fighting for today. tavis: for our country, how important will it be for u
PBS
Jan 12, 2010 6:00pm EST
salaries, benefits and bonuses. one of those was bank of america, an underwriter of the newshour. today the securities and exchange commission accused bank of america of failing to disclose huge losses at merrill lynch before buying it. the bank is already charged with hiding bonuses paid at merrill. still, the news of a possible bank tax was met with anger on wall street. where some saw it as a way to get at bonuses. jamie diamond, chairman of jp morgan chase told a washington conference on monday, quote, i'm getting tired of the constant vilification. this is not a casino. still, the issue won't go away. the federal deposit insurance corporation said today that it may impose higher premiums on banks to discourage risky lending and investments. the question of whether to tax banks may not be limited simply the question of whether to tax banks may not be limited simply to costs associated with the so- called tarp program. all told, the federal reserve and the government committed several trillion dollars to the financial system at the height of the crisis. so what, if anything, s
PBS
Jan 4, 2010 12:30pm EST
analysis there because it's only a minority of the jewish community in america that have any affiliation with the synagogue at all and a much smaller minority of that, 10% of the orthodox, for example. >> has this exploration gone on with respect to the minority of jews who are observant? is there a higher percentage of them who are republicans than democrats? >> not necessarily republicans than democrats because there are urban concentrations, and here in new york they certainly identify as conservative, especially on the social and cultural issues, abortion being the number one, but they -- >> what percentage of registering as a republican? >> precisely, if you're in borough park or brooklyn -- >> because of what's happening in the middle east. >> this could change, very interestingly, yes yet. >> i am measured because the "rabbit" books to a degree because people came to love him -- some did, not everybody but people look at me sadly and say "how could you have killed him?" it is my duty as a novelist to see him through. i thought that kind of man might well come to an ear
PBS
Jan 18, 2010 7:00pm EST
the tax cuts -- the bush tax cuts for the 98% of america that makes less than a quarter million dollars a year, so overall, it's a big tax cut, so -- i mean, i think the argument that -- for the very, very high-income people that they would go back to rates that existed in the 1990's -- that that would be really devastating to growth while we are cutting taxes for almost everyone in the country very substantially -- i guess i don't buy into that. >> tom: austan, you have been talking taxes, certainly in the last several days at the white house, talking about the possibility of a bank tax for some very large banks that took tarp money. i want to ask you about financial regulation. do you sense that the priority list has changed significantly in year two? >> well, you know, the priority list is changing because the president has accomplished a bunch of things in year one so we don't have to do those anymore but i mean, we had rescue of the economy, prevent of abyss, that was fairly important and we did succeed in doing that. now, the rebuilding and getting robust growth, i think,
PBS
Jan 7, 2010 6:00pm EST
across america. nearly 200,000 jobs created. we see beyond cars. >> chevron. this is the power of human energy. >> we are intel, sponsors of tomorrow. the national science foundation. supporting education and research across all fields of science and engineering. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> lehrer: the official story of how the airline bomb plot eluded u.s. security was made public today, and at the white house, president obama ordered changes in the handling of information on potential threats. the report said the government had sufficient information to potentially disrupt the plot. it faulted u.s. intelligence for failing to focus more resources on the al qaeda group that claimed responsibility for the attempted attack. and it said the c.i.a. and the national counter-terrorism center did not search all available databases for the nigerian charged with the attempted bombing. newshou
PBS
Jan 21, 2010 6:00pm EST
clinton has undoubtedly become one of the most divisive figures in america.... >> brown: the conservative group "citizens united" produced the film and wanted to run ads for it on television, and distribute it through on-demand cable. instead, federal courts ruled it was akin to a long campaign ad, and should be regulated like one. ultimately, the supreme court disagreed. but today's decision did leave in place other restrictions, including a century-old ban on donations by companies directly to candidates for federal office. direct contributions from political action committees-- created by corporations, unions and individuals-- will still be allowed. the decision is expected to leave candidates, parties and contributors scrambling to adjust to the new reality with crucial congressional elections now 10 months away. >> brown: marcia coyle of the national law journal was of course at the court this morning... and is now here with us. >> thanks, jeff glf i say "of course" because this was called a special sitting of the court. >> we knew something was afoot. this was an argume
PBS
Jan 27, 2010 6:00pm EST
last year just hasn't yielded the results. right now, families across america around the kitchen table worried about prospects about employment, the future for their kids. we want to hear some solutions that are akin to what we've been working on for the last 12 months. >> reporter: the president will address the nation this evening at 9:00 pm eastern time. >> lehrer: and to shields and welcome, mr. axelrod. >> thanks, gwen. good to be with you. >> ifill: we've heard so many times the next speech the president is going to give, whatever it is, is the speech of a lifetime. what makes tonight different? >> well, you know, that is what washington does every speech. it becomes a speech of the lifetime. no doubt it's an important speech and it's an important speech because americans have been through a very difficult time and they're looking for a sense of what the future will hold. the president is going to talk about where we've been and where we're going and how we create jobs in this country that pay well, see wages grow, and secure the middle class again after this very difficult perio
PBS
Jan 22, 2010 6:00pm EST
for the pbs newshour is provided by: pacific life bank of america >> chevron. this is the power of human energy. toyota. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> lehrer: the exodus from haiti's shattered capital kept building today. aid officials reported 200,000 haitians have fled port-au- prince. the government talked of setting up vast new tent cities. and an 84-year-old woman was pulled alive from the rubble, after ten days. margaret warner talked earlier today with jay newton small of "time" magazine from port-au- prince. >> warner: jay newton small, thank you for joining us. we are hearing reports of tens of thousands, in fact hundreds of thousands of haitians fleeing the city. what have you seen? >> i have certainly seen that. the port is clogged with f
PBS
Jan 29, 2010 7:00pm EST
reaching something resembling the end. only in america can a legislative wrangle lasting almost a year be described by one side as a rush to judgment. clearly, the main losers in this whole thing have been proponents for transparency of government. anyone who even peeked at the day-by-day coverage of the healthcare slog through the house, then five senate committees-- hey, why not a dozen-- and then the full senate, must have come away with a strong case of yeech. we've been warned, by bismarck no less, not to watch laws and sausages being made. transparency wont change our lawmakers, any more than it would change the sausage-makers; it will only change us, make us turn angrier, more alienated from the process. the big winners in this whole thing? commercial television, broadcast and cable alike. the washington post reported recently that $200 million was spent by pro- and opponents, and most of it, aside from some nicely appointed k street offices, went straight into 30- second tv spots. if it hadn't been for that wave of income, the television industry might have suffered this recession
PBS
Jan 8, 2010 7:00pm EST
, goldman sachs, bank of america, and morgan stanley are just some of the people who will face tough questions from the financial crisis inquiry commission. the panel created by congress and is holding hearings wednesday and thursday, and everyone will be required to testify under oath. >> tom: tonight's "market monitor" guest is sandy lincoln, investment strategist at m&i investment management. he joins us from the c.m.e. group. sandy welcome to nbr. welcome to nbr. good to see you again. >> good the see you again. >> hudson: investors in emerging markets have done better, are you seeing a bubble in the making overseas? >> oh, tom, i don't think it's a bubble. i think it's not defying gravity at all, but market reality. over the last ten years the emerging markets have had phenomenal economic growth of almost 8% a year compounded over inflation, and the u.s. has grown at 4%. so investors follow that economic growth and the stock markets rewarded them. as you pointed out in prior broadcasts this has been a 0% growth rate in the u.s., but in the eearn manying markets you have 9% a yea
PBS
Jan 13, 2010 12:00pm EST
middle. everyday people in middle america. not being driven by new york. what do you make of that? >> as long as i've been in this business, when they show you that little graph in the numbers, i pretend like i know what they are talking about. yeah, i see there is a 69 in that thing there? that's great. awesome. i don't know. you know, i totally go towards what makes me proud. you know, makes me feel like it is a big middle finger to everyone who said i couldn't do it because i hope there is a bunch of girls and ladies behind me that are wanting to do the same thing and better that i need to they path for. so many women did it for me. oz our job. tavis: you got to admit that is pretty cool. >> kind of cool. [laughter] if i may gloat. tavis: you can gloat. you have earned it. speaking of the numbers, let's talk about the other movie, "the proposal." i don't know what to ask about this movie because there is thr has been so much talk about "the blind side." were these things planned to come out at the same time? >> everyone said you have done so much work this year. i said no, it i
PBS
Jan 25, 2010 7:00pm EST
oil drilling in 2010. halliburton today said drilling in north america is picking up. that assessment came after the company reported a big earnings drop. halliburton expects 2010 to be much better than last year. halliburton stock saw more than twice average volume, plenty of interest, but not much price movement. others out this week include baker hughes and weatherford tomorrow. smith international on wednesday. these three mixed ahead of their results. a number of power companies are due up for earnings this week. the line-up for this week from utilities looks like this. tomorrow, florida's f.p.l. group is first up. the stock is at eight month lows. on wednesday, it's southern group, and on thursday with american electric and dominion resources. thanks to the weak economy, demand for power was down in the fourth quarter as we saw in exelon's earnings back on friday, but hopes are it will pick up as the economy improves. citi analyst brian chin figures utilities will cut their spending on big projects, some called capital spending, by about 4%, while earnings and dividends will con
PBS
Jan 11, 2010 12:00pm EST
vietnam, iraq, american colonial period. we have a history, and not just america, the french, spanish, english, the portuguese -- invading and taking what we need. we force out indigenous cultures and sometimes wipe them out completely. we don't have truly indigenous cultures left in this world. there are few in the amazon or in the new guinea. some of them are going extinct on a daily basis. i sort of extrapolate it even further, this idea of entitlement. we take what we need, and we don't give back. we have the start giving back. we have to start aggressively expecting -- accepting our responsibility. tavis: had to give the proper treatment to the issues that you have laid out? as a filmmaker, i assume you want us to marinate on some of these things beyond the theater experience. how do you do that without being preachy? >> it is a fine line. you have donto put holes spoonfs of sugar in there, people coming out saying that they cried three times. having this emotional reaction. that is part of it. don't assume that you have to give people information. assume that they have
PBS
Jan 7, 2010 7:00pm EST
wide volatility. you saw the 5% jump on general electric and bank of america has significant buying interest today moving up nicely. let's look at the market focus this evening. tomorrow, jobs come into focus. from housing to retail, employment is the keystone for strong and sustainable growth. but, as everyone has heard, expectations are pretty low. the job market is predicted to have lost 35,000 jobs in december. the number comes out tomorrow morning at 8:30 eastern time. that would show some erosion in the labor market compared to the 11,000 jobs lost in november. but it would be an improvement from october. adding up two years of job losses totals more than seven million out of work americans. manufacturing has seen more than two million jobs disappear. financial services employees a half million fewer people than it did in january of 2008. but a couple of surprising places were there may be hiring into the spring is home construction and sales at least according to homebuilder lennar. on its earnings conference call today, lennar's c.e.o. said the business is stabilizing and it
PBS
Jan 8, 2010 5:30pm EST
financial affairs. welcome to bbc world news broadcasting to an america on pbs. a u.n. proposal to store nuclear fuel. first, but up close and on camera, tiger cubs are filled in the wild. -- filmed in the wild. the young nigerian man accused of the christmas day airliner bomb plot in the united states has pleaded not guilty at his first court appearance. the suspect, umar farouk abdulmutallab, said he understood the charges against him. he has been indicted on six charges including the attempted murder of 290 passengers and crew on board of the american plane. this was not a long process today. >> not at all. less than three minutes to the whole thing took. umar farouk abdulmutallab was in court wearing leg irons and dressed in a t-shirt. he was asked whether he had taken pain killers, he said he had. he said that he understood fully the charges against him and whether he had a chance to discuss them with his defense team. at that time, his defense counsel asked for a plea of not guilty. the most serious charges are the attempt to use a weapon of mass destruction and murder the ot
PBS
Jan 18, 2010 5:30pm EST
in the basement. >> a very warm welcome to "bbc worldñ news," broadcast in america on pbs and elsewhere around the world. the man who shot pope john paul ii is released. we'll look at why mystery still surrounds the assassination attempt. and a welcome to new zealand's prince. hello to you. nearly one week after the earthquake struck haiti and despite a colossal international efforts, tens of thousands of victims are still waiting for aid -- despite a colossal international effort. large numbers of earthquake survivors are having to fend for themselves. many are just trying to leave the city. our correspondent is in port-au- prince. >> it has been nearly one week since this happened, and it is not surprising that the american general is in charge of the relief operation year, he says he believes the final death toll, although we may not know that accurately -- the american general who is in charge of the relief operation here. in terms of the aid effort that is coming in here, we are at the airport in port-au-prince. flights are beginning to come in at a much more regular basi
PBS
Jan 25, 2010 12:00pm EST
america is a medium six. there will be about six companies with somewhere between 18%-20% of the car market, whereas gm is to have half of the car market and everybody split the rest. there will be more technology, plug-in hybrids, all-electric cars, a lot of different things that cannot be a follow the leader game as it used to be, if you will. for policymakers, the lessons are if you're going to intervene in private industry, a, make sure there is a critical need for it. there was a crisis in the economy last year, arguably still lives, but not as bad as it was, not in free fall. the second thing is, the wind, have tough terms, get in and get out. do not continue the drip of corporate welfare for years and decades. tavis: pulitzer prize-winning author of the booked "crash course -- the american automobiles road from glory to disaster," paul ingrassia. thank you for being on the program. >> thank you. tavis: up next, actress keri russell. stay with us. pleased to welcome keri russell back to this program. the globe poll -- the gloat -- the golden globe and winning actress is back wi
PBS
Jan 18, 2010 12:30pm EST
in haiti last week from washington, pamela cox, the world bank's vice president, for latin america, and the caribbean region and robert perito an expert on haiti at the u.s. institute of peace. mi pleased to have all of them here. we have been trying to do on this program without sort of access to hate any the same way that large media organizations have is bring to this table people who understand that country, who understand what is necessary to do, and who understand and have, you know, some serious interest from their involvement in seeing positive things come out of what has been an awful tragedy. i began with my friend ray kelly. so you know this country. what has to happen there to respond to this crisis in a way that you have some hope rather than the worst that could unfold. >> well, i think we have to continue to get rescue personnel on the ground. there is still i think an opportunity to save lives there. i mean the death toll, of course, is just phenomenal. but i think saving lives is still a job number one. getting food and water to the population, of course, is critic
PBS
Jan 14, 2010 6:00pm EST
more people there from latin america and the caribbean and from the u.s., canada, france, all of europe and all of asia combined. they care. and finally, we have the inter-american development bank, the world bank, and the whole u.n. system totally committed to this and, again, i can't say enough for the commitment that president obama has made. and, you know, hillary canceled her trip to asia to come back and work on this. we've loved haiti for 35 years now. she's... she's distraught about it, but committed and on the job, staying there all weekend to work. the a.i.d. director, mr. shaw, is doing a good job e. we're going to get through this and i think there will be even more determination to honor the plan they have... it's not my economic plan, it's theirs. their government has embraced it. but we've got to help them with the living and the dead right now. and if we do this right and they feel the support of people around the world and next door, then i think you will see us resuming at an even more rapid rate the implementation of this plan. >> lehrer: all right. mr. preside
PBS
Jan 15, 2010 6:00pm EST
president rene preval on the telephone this morning. >> i pledged america's continued commitment to the government and the people of haiti in the immediate effort to save lives and deliver relief, and in the long-term effort to rebuild. >> holman: for now, severe damage to the port-au-prince harbor made airlifts the only reliable way to get the aid onshore. and helicopters from the newly arrived u.s. navy aircraft carrier "carl vinson" ferried in their first relief supplies today. but the city's badly damaged airport remained a bottleneck. with the control tower disabled, the u.s. military officially took over takeoffs and landings today. these soldiers from the 82nd airborne division shipped out yesterday, but did not set down until late last night, after waiting hours to be cleared to land. in washington, the growing desperation in haiti intensified the focus on the pentagon's efforts to get the aid operation into high gear. u.s. military leaders said today there could be 10,000 american troops in port-au-prince and offshore by monday. in a morning briefing, joint chiefs chairman
PBS
Jan 11, 2010 12:30pm EST
called humor in america that i think he did in high school which you see that he's collected pages from mad magazine, angelo torres who was a mad magazine cartoonist. >> charlie: how much involvement did he have in making the show. >> as much as we wanted but not more. every time we asked him for input with the design of the show, he was happy to offer it but he also wanted it to be in the moma show. visitors will find when they walk through the monster mouth although it's inside tim's brain it's still on the show. we had a designer who worked on the show. basically any time we wanted input from him do you feel this way, either he would defer to us and say you guys know best or he would come up with a new work that would help us understand what he was trying to do. >> charlie: thank you very much. this is an extraordinary film with lots of attention. it is open in the museum of modern art. it runs through april. when we come back, tim burton. >> charlie: tell be about this. you were almost a pack rather but not a guy who says i'm going to put this away because some day they're going to
PBS
Jan 14, 2010 12:30pm EST
: what's the status of our free press in america? thomas jefferson famously once said, as you know, "a choice between a government and a free press, i'd take the free press." >> right. the well, i think we spent a century, really, building up through constitutional law, through public policy, through the standards of journalism the best free press and independent press in the world and probably of all time. and i think the... i think it's still very vigorous and vibrant. it's obviously suffering financially enormously. and there's a contraction of news both at the local level and at the international level that's really concerning, but it's still, i think, the best in the world. the big question, i think, is given where we are in terms of globalization-- which is primarily an economic and business integration of the world, how do we build a free press now on a global scale? we did hit in the last century on a national scale. now the problem is how do we do it on a global scale? and, of course, the google event today, the reports of google is just one of many that one can cite about how
PBS
Jan 22, 2010 12:30pm EST
haiti, for example, is while the country is a mess, the haitian immigrants in america do very well, extremely well. >> they do. they are prosperous, they're indoes truss, and very well-spoken. the educational system in terms of french is very, very good. i think mick alearned her french from a haitian lady who was helping in our house. and there is -- >> she has told us she sure as hell didn't learn it from you. >> yours is awful. >> do you believe she would say that to you? >> i think mick aknows how to say bonjour. >> i am actually fluent. >> oh, please. >> rose: i am pleased to have mika brzezinski back at this table by herself. and welcome. >> thank you. it's great to be here. we go way back. >> rose: yes, we do. as we have chronicled on this program. >> yes, we have. >> rose: but i am honored always to see you. so a memoir, a story of your life, and you are a mere child. what is going on here? a story you wanted to tell? >> well, it's more -- it's a journey that i think i found that, with a platform like we have, i have found that a lot of young women ask me a lot of questions
PBS
Jan 12, 2010 12:30pm EST
it's still ed ted by that genius bob silvers. edited. the library of america and now i'm doing this thing with that book machine. the always with respect to... everything i've done has been developed and preserved back list. >> rose: here's what surprises me. how many books have you sflaed >> only three or four, ii/k thi. >> rose: why only three or four? >> because if you're in the publishing business as i was, you have to submerge your own ego to the work of other people, you don't want anything interfere with that. you v to forget that you have interests of your own and do everything for the writer. so it's only after i left the business that i was able to write it all. and this thing grew out... this little book here grew out of articles i wrote for the "times" magazine. >> rose: "eating, a memoir" jason epstein. is it always good to be able to talk about somebody's passion. if you can tap into the passion of someone-- whether it's food or books or theater or some other aspect of what makes them get up everyday-- it's a great story. >> oh, yeah. yeah. always. >> rose: and this is
PBS
Jan 4, 2010 6:00pm EST
and filed a lawsuit against the black water security firm. both in america and iraq. we won't abandon our right to punish this firm. >> sreenivasan: the blackwater guards claimed they were ambushed. prosecutors and many iraqis said the guards use of machine guns and grenades was unprovoked. the first business day of the new year saw a surge in stocks and the price of oil. wall street surged on encouraging news about manufacturing in the u.s. and china. the dow jones industrial average gained nearly 156 points to close just under 10,584. the nasdaq rose 39 points to close at 2308. and oil closed above $81 a barrel for the first time in nearly three months, as frigid weather gripped the eastern u.s. and drove up demand. the number of bankruptcies in the u.s. rose 32% in 2009. the associated press reported today consumers and businesses filed more than 1.4 million bankruptcy petitions. the number of cases fell sharply in 2006 after congress overhauled u.s. bankruptcy laws, but they've been rising ever since. the tallest building on earth formally opened today in dubai. we have a report n
PBS
Jan 27, 2010 5:30pm EST
program. >> a warm welcome, "bbc world news" broadcast on pbs in america and around the globe. lessons from the meltdown, the world economic forum opens, calling for a rethink of capitalism. and healing the wounds, the children of haiti, air lifted to new york. >>> hello. could the afghans president's plans to offer talks and money to the taliban not undermine the freedoms won by the afghan people? tommy karzai has been defending himself against accusations ahead of thursday's london conference on afghanistan. britain's prime minister gordon brown answered questions from afghan and british students and defended his deployment of british troops. our world affairs correspondent was there. >> president karzai arrives in london knowing that he has repair work to do on his reputation and that of his government. last year's afghan elections were widely seen as flawed by widespread corruption. at the same time, more western troops than ever were killed or injured in the war against the taliban. was it worth the price, one student asked? >>. is it shoulders have been fighting in afgha
PBS
Jan 26, 2010 7:00pm EST
bank of america and four community groups on the city's southwest side. the bank provides the names of customers who are more than 60 days delinquent on their mortgages. the groups and their volunteers then work with those customers to get their loans modified. since november, bank of america has released the names of more than 500 customers in this predominantly hispanic community. the bank says language barriers often make it hard for it to communicate with these borrowers, so volunteers like silvia cisneros are a big help. >> some of them are happy to see us, that we are from their church, their parish; that we are not there to sell anything or get them into trouble, but just to tell them where they can go for help. >> reporter: counselors at the four agencies work aggressively with homeowners to gather all of the necessary paperwork for refinancing. >> can i get some additional information from you? >> reporter: follow-up calls to track down missing documents are common. donna stites heads up one of the groups working on the project, and admits the process is sometimes frustrating.
PBS
Jan 15, 2010 5:30pm EST
themselves. >> america's efforts start to kick in. troops and helicopters arrive in port-au-prince. >> i want the people to know we will do what it takes to save lives and to help them get back on their feet. >> amid the wreckage and chaos, survivors are still being found. this boy was pulled from the rubble. welcome to "bbc world news." coming up later for you -- back at work and back on trial. the latest hearing in the corruption case against silvio berlusconi. getting his wings. prince william's picks up his award from the royal air force. hello to you. the scale of what has been promised to help the people of haiti is impressive. from 30 countries, hundreds of millions of dollars. from the u.s., of around 10,000 troops. 72 hours after the earthquake, what has reached people is desperately limited compared to the need. a few people are being pulled alive from the rubble. others are without sleep, light, communications, and are reduced to begging and fighting for food and water. >> good evening from port-au- prince, a capital city that is a huge disaster zone. i have been in the street
PBS
Jan 30, 2010 4:30am EST
say, "that's all right. this is a free market society. america's all about free markets. what's wrong with that? that is a basic american value." >> the marketplace of ideas doesn't give any one, any corporation or any individual the constitutional right to buy an election. i mean, the first amendment is an important part of our constitution, but so is the idea that this is a democracy. this is... no matter this is a society based on the idea of one person, one vote. and our elections should not be marketplaces. they should be about voters. they should be about helping the electorate make an informed decision. and the electorate is not going to be able to make an informed decision if all they can see on the air, if all they can, you know, hear on the radio are, you know, attack ads funded by hidden corporate agendas. >> i would say that it's... we're a society of freedom and markets. and political freedom is so important. political freedom means the freedom to speak and say what you as an individual citizen believe, the freedom to vote. and it means having some power in your soc
PBS
Jan 29, 2010 6:00pm EST
america. thank you, everybody. (applause) >> woodruff: now, more on the president's appearance before house republicans-- someone who was there for it all, texas representative jeb hensarling. congressman hensarling, thanks for being with us and for standing out in the cold. what did you take away from this unusual session? >> well, you're right, judy, it was an unusual session. listen, the president deserves great credit for accepting our invitation. i'm glad that he did it. i'm hoping something good will come out of it. we've never seen any kind of outreach from speaker pelosi to attempt to work on a bipartisan basis. i hope we see one out of the president. there are some areas maybe we can work on. but i got to tell you, the american people want accountability in government. and regardless of whether you are a republican or democrat today i think was at least a chapter in accountability. i mean things like the louisiana purchase and the cornhusker kickback, people want to see some accountability. they saw it today. >> woodruff: you asked him a question about the budget he's going t
PBS
Jan 23, 2010 4:30am EST
of them, at least-- and america is red again.ñr listen to the right's partisan boom box: >> republicans are starting to go where no republicans have gone before-- places, strange places, for republicans-- like new jersey, and possibly now massachusetts. >> tonight everything-- yes, everything-- is turned upside down. the political impossible has happened. >> this was a center-right country, even in massachusetts, repudiating a left agenda. this is not rocket science. >> moyers: but let's get another take on the news from two avowed progressives known for their candor and clarity. melissa harris-lacewell is an associate professor of politics and african american studies at princeton university. her commentary and analysis have appeared in publications across the country. she's at work on a new book titled, "sister citizen: a text for colored girls who've considered politics when being strong wasn't enough." eric alterman is distinguished professor of english and journalism at brooklyn college, and a professor of journalism at the city university of new york graduate schoo
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